Episode 2.08: Outlander Boss Responds and How I Live With It

Written by: Teddie Potter



Fast on the heels of my recent SM lovefest post tossing virtual bouquets to Ron D. Moore et al for their Outlander adaptation, I now stand before (or after) this book-reader’s experience that is Episode 2.08.  Here’s what I wrote on Friday, May 27th at 4:30 PM EST....





Whose Reality Bites?


Then comes the episode that night.  Oh me, oh my. I am not in the recapping business, so here’s my a little snarky first impression:

Nell Hudson’s in the back-to-Scotland opening credits; I was forewarned, but still therapeutically lying to myself, sure that Leghair was merely slated as a disgruntled bystander covertly shooting daggers at Claire, and longing looks at Jamie.  And that was just the opening of an episode that gave us a microsecond of J and C back at Lallybroch, where potatoes took center stage, and the visuals of the still newly married Jamie and Claire bonding in that way that we love to visualize on screen were left to our fanfic imaginations.  Ron, take note:  sex scenes between Jamie and Claire are never gratuitous.  EVER.  


After a tender scene between Jamie and his newborn niece, and adorable Fergus on an adorable donkey, we are treated to Leghair in a Hester Prynne cap, Jamie’s ill-groomed and insanely superstitious grandsire, and then the dysfunctional family of Clans planning board, with poor Colum’s health significantly declined since last season.  This, not before Claire pimps out Leg to Lovat Junior, whose wig might go well with Jamie’s ex-beard, and Jamie says thank you, Leg.  Highlanders, swords, and heartbreak move inexorably forward. Close credits.





Ron D. Moore, You Got Some ‘Splaining to Do

Or does he? 

I declared my adaptation-lover status not 24 hours prior, yet had to seriously re-watch this episode to help begin to understand the why and the what-the-hell. In an interview with RDM posted by The Hollywood Reporter, “’Outlander’ Boss………. Explains Major Book Change” (and other things in the title, which are not relevant to this blog piece, and therefore omitted), Mr. Moore sheds some light from the showrunner’s perspective.  

My Very Condensed  Overview
  1. Dragonfly in Amber is a bear to adapt for the screen
  2. Laoghaire’s redemption is necessary for the Season 3 story
  3. Diana Gabaldon understands
  4. Lovat’s and Colum’s motivations are laid out nicely
  5. Claire hangs on to a sliver of hope that the outcome of Culloden might be changed
  6. War’s a-comin'

And Here Are My Takeaways:
  1. Unsubstantiated tease for the 1 millionth time -->we get Season Three?
  2. He knows we didn’t want Leghair 
  3. Diana Gabaldon didn’t, either (bolstered by her SM posts on the topic)
  4. Boo frickety hoo on us
  5. Jamie the perfect man is soon to be the perfect leader of men in battle.


The Old Me?

I’ve done my share of complaining:  the Claire and Murtagh road show of squirminess of “The Search”, and the rent-a-dildo and toilet travails of “Not in Scotland Anymore”.  Alternately , I’ve accepted (but not embraced) the sight of Jamie’s hand lingering on Leggy’s goose-pimpled breast in “The Reckoning” (I know; it was a cold day in Scotland, and he did remove the hand), and now, Jamie and Claire pandering to the superstitious old Fox through ersatz visions.  Claire conspiring with Leggy? Mais, non! C’est incroyable! Wait.  We are not in France anymore:  Hell to the NO!  And one flirtatious female interaction with lil’ Simon will do what years of modern day therapy cannot easily accomplish:  turn a parentally emasculated Simon into a less neurotic MAY-UN.  More power to him, by the way; this method does not incur copays.  

Just Me.

I implicitly trust RDM to deliver this adaptation, and have from the beginning despite the changes, but still I worry.  While finally having a screen adaptation of Outlander is a literary dream come true, Dragonfly is my least liked and least read of the novels, while Voyager is my next-in-line cherished favorite, after Outlander.  I worry, as the handling of Voyager may in fact, be the testing ground for my level of open-mindedness.  Ms Pollyanna Potter doesn’t have the ability to shut up; it’s not in the genes.  But with an open mind toward the art form on screen, and my well-read novels for any needed solace,  I think I’m set.

What’s your mindset?  Are you in for the long-haul?
Do you think Jamie will forgive Laoghaire any time soon?  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

35 comments

  1. Great review and thoughts, Teddie. I agree 100%

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    1. Thank you, Nise! It's all about expectations; don't you think?

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  2. Great review and thoughts, Teddie. I agree 100%

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  3. This lates episode was HORRIBLE. It was just poorly constructed, poorly written, poorly directed...and just not in keeping with the story, the spirit of the story, or the quality of previous episodes. It was just completely cheesey (maybe that would have been good to put on the freakin' potatoes.) It reminded me of that super cheesey show Hercules back in the early 90s... typical insipid television that was concerned more about the story arc of an episode than the quality of the story told. I'd like to say that the reintroduction of Laoghaire was not the worst part of the episode (though it was absolutely the DUMBEST idea that the showrunners could push down the throats of the fan faithfuls....like waving red at a bull...the only reason you would do that was to garner the horns...so I can only think that they are trying to get additional press through creating controversey with fans?) The worst part of the story was presenting Young Simon as a spineless numpty who is his father's whipping post.

    And enough with Claire and her pretend visions. We don't need them in back-to-back episodes.

    This was without doubt THE WORST episode of the entire franchise. It's so bad that I don't even really care how bad it is.... because I can't even accept it as part of the series. You know when a nesting bird lays a bad egg and won't even sit on it? That's kind of how I feel about this episode.

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    1. April, thanks for putting into words what I suspect are the thoughts of many. The passion that we feel for these stories is a mighty thing, and RDM's need to defend his actions is interesting, no? I can recall another episode that didn't sit well with you, and that was Lallybroch. An adaptation is hard to swallow when it alters the valued traits of the characters. Here's hoping for another kind of redemption. Thanks for reading and commenting, April.

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    2. Thank you April for voicing my thoughts, worst episode of Outlander so far, very disappointed in the ohh so short stint at Lallybroch, it was lovely, but far too short, and don't get me started again on Laoghaire! What was she doing there, and no, she is not sorry, and if they think the honourable Jamie Fraser would disrespect Claire's memory by doing what he does in the books with Laoghaire, now that he knows what an evil witch she is, "they" don't understand him at all! The only way forward is to totally leave that storyline out, and invent a new path, or it will be Claire justifiably shooting Jamie when she returns, and not hanging around to heal him!I haven't stopped growling since #208 aired Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

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    3. I can't even re-watch it. Once was enough.

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    4. I can't even re-watch it. Once was enough.

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    5. I'm happy about season 3 and 4 but not very confident that future episodes will ever measure upo to Season One. They have screwed this season up more than not and I'm jinda board. Id rather just go back to the recordfed books and relive the magic and nourne the lost opportunity tio bring these amazing stories to the screen. Shame on you RDM.

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  4. Why mess with a good (no wonderful) story that DG has laid out? Artistic license my ass. This whole episode was so awkward and well, off-putting. Especially for me the horrible moment Claire has her vision...Yikes...Even Cait must have felt awkward because her acting of the scene was just terrible. It was my "just the shark" moment because this was not the Claire anyone could or should accept. I can even take Leery over that. And while I'm at it...I have been re-reading the books and the thing that jumped out at me that is not in the series is Jamie's very lovely and wry sense of humor. He being dour all the time is just not the Jamie I love. So all that being said I will, of course, continue to watch because I love the story. Just disappointed that the heart of the story (the Jamie and Claire relationship of course) is not given its due.

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    1. Susanna, I keep waiting for those characteristics you mention to surface. I have faith, but I guess I have to take what I get which isn't too shabby, overall. But I feel you--my husband, a non book reader, thought the episode was great. Perhaps ignorance is bliss? Thanks for your comment.

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  5. Yes, this was a puzzling episode. I wanted Claire and Jamie to have a little more time to re-connect before it all fell apart again. How about a nice, warm sexual connection so we know they've recovered (as much as possible) from the heartbreak of France and on-going BJR trauma? I get that Laoghaire has to appear prior to Season 3 (does she really?) - can't we just insert her gradually and then let her fulfill her role? I think too much time was spent on her, and I didn't like Claire's scheming and getting Laoghaire's buy-in using Jamie as the bait. She's just fueling Laoghaire's love for Jamie and she should know better than to trust her. Underhanded, and it's too trusting of Claire, after she just got done telling Laoghaire she'd pretty much never forgive her for what she did. My heart broke at the parting of Colum and Jamie - I know they were at odds, but he may never see him again. And, there are tough times ahead. I just wanted a larger/longer dose of Lallybroch before it all had to end.

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  6. Thanks, Anne, for your comment. Lallybroch was sorely neglected, I agree, and you already know my feelings about our need to see more than a fade to black to know the love connection between J & C. Claire, as imperfect a hero as Jamie, wouldn't dignify Leghair with with the amount of attention she gave her in 2.08. Coming directly after the fabulousness that was "Faith", my heart is hurting a wee bit.

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  7. I agree and I totally understand adaptation. I can let go of a lot of things for the sake of "seeing" Outlander but I feel like the further we go with the series the farther we get from the heart of the story. This episode just sealed the deal for me. It felt like an over dramatized and under handed adaptation.

    I actually feel like we could have dedicated the entire episode to the bonding, healing and reconnecting of Jamie, Claire and the Fraiser family. We need to see Fergus get time to heal. We could have seen the preparation for knowing what is to come. And we could have seen J&C get those moments together that make what is to come even more heartbreaking.

    To save time RDM could have relegated the whole Old Fox part to a family discussion, a flashback or just the last 15 minutes of the show.

    Even tho last weeks "Faith" was a stellar episode, throughout season 2 I feel like we have slowly lost what makes Outlander the story I have loved - Clarie *work* as a healer, not just talk about it, history as powerfully acted scenery but only as scenery and watching a husband and wife who work thru differences, who have some flaws in personalities but yet their love and respect for each other prevails.

    Maybe that just doesn't play to the audience they want or fit into their big picture... but it sure would make me happy.

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    1. Thanks for writing, Just Visiting. You make a book reader's perfect sense. I believe these stories contain enough inherent drama to dispense with this week's dabbling. Heck, the balance of the story could play out beautifully minus Laoghaire twist. Sigh. I'm no film maker, of course, yet I still feel guilty for complaining about it. Voyager will be my true test of faith.

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  8. I've been disappointed all season. I think problem began with The Search (the dumbest episode of tv I have seen). It was Jenny spurting breast milk and Claire and Murtagh singing and dancing all over town looking for Jamie. At end of The Watch Ian tells them the Redcoats have Jamie. So they should have gone right to Wentworth episode and then there would be 2 episodes left. That could have been Ransom part 1 and 2 just like the book. When they arrived in France in first episode this season all would have been well except for some flashbacks Jamie would have. Why did RDM decide to have Jamie see BJR whenever Jamie tried to make love to Claire? He has said this was a harder book to adapt but he has made it harder. Already wondering how much Frank and Laoghaire will be in 3rd season. We only need to see Frank's final conversation with Claire and when Laoghaire, Jamie and Claire meet. The rest can be told to us. We don't have to see it. I'm here for rest of season but if they don't tell Jamie & Claire's story next season I won't be. If Ron doesn't like their story then he should have written his own show. I miss who Jamie really is although he was more himself in 208. I also miss his humor. Even Claire is different. I truly think if RDM had his way when Jamie took Claire to the stones last season he would have had her go back to Frank. The really sad thing is such a disconnect with Jamie & Claire this season for no reason and knowing their time apart from book 2 to 3. I give season 1 an A+ and this season a C.

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    1. Janet, thank you for reading and responding. I feel your pain, but I am willing to place my mind and heart in "adaptation mode" for now, in order to continue, and truly to see where this goes. I feel that the big missing links are the love scenes to help cement and restore the heart of Jamie and Claire to the viewing audience. There we might see both the humor and the passion that seems to have disappeared so far this season.

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  10. I totally get why we had to get Laoghaire .. They had to do a little back peddling. If they just left Laoghaire role as it was written in season 1 she would not have made an appearance in season 2. Not sure this will redeem her in Jamie's eyes in season 3 - once you try to get someone killed that just does not disappear with "I have changed and I am sorry".

    I had other issues with this episode. We got 3, well 2 1/2 episodes of Jamie dealing with his PTSD. Losing a baby we get a voice over and a prelude to Claire and Jamie have sex. More Lallybroch was needed more family time and healing was needed. No lets jump into a visit to the Old Fox and has sniveling poet reading wimpy bad hair son.

    After several weeks of a high on really good episodes I was sadly disappointed in 208. Previous episodes seemed to take 10 minutes .. This one felt like an hour.

    DIA is not a favorite book of mine and thus far enjoying season 2 a lot better

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    1. Donna, thanks for your comment. I think one positive is that Jamie knows of Leggie's tricks early on, where in the books, he does not until much much later. This has got to impact the story going forward. I too would have loved to have some peace and breathing space at Lallybroch.

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  11. Oh, Teddie, just when my blood pressure was getting back to normal, here you go riling me up again! First let me start by saying that I understand how monumental a task it is trying to adapt these books and truly appreciate how much heart and soul all the writers and producers, along with the rest of the cast and crew, put into this show. I personally really like all of them and don't want to disparage any of them. I want to love every episode, not find fault. I was just starting to be able to "put the book down" and enjoy the series.

    With that being said, I agree with what everyone says, starting back to Season 1. They dug themselves quite a hole in Ep. 9 with Boobgate and continued it with the witch trial. Now the hole is as big as the Grand Canyon, and am totally clueless with how they think this episode redeemed her or made a bad situation any better.

    Again, I understand the concept of adaptation and know it "can't be word for word" and things will have to be left out, condensed or slightly modified. With that being said, my first big issue this season started with the episode showing Mary Hawkins' rape, the ridiculous strategy of trying to show up BPC and the slapstick farce of a brawl at the end. Is this not a drama? This is where the powers that be wanted to insert [questionable] "humor"? There are so many instances of using the characters' own [much missing] senses of humor if they wanted to lighten up some scenes while at the same time giving us better glimpses of their wonderful personalities. After spending so much time being sensitive to Jamie's PTSD and its aftermath, they show such insensitivity to Mary's hysterics after her rape?

    Then we have two really good, albeit jam-packed, episodes and now that I've relaxed again, come to Episode 8. I am by no means blaming Anne Kenney for this, although she had to be part of it. I realize that it's a collaboration of all the writers and the producers to come up with episode arcs, ideas and plotlines, but IMO I think there might have been a wee bit too much whisky involved in this meeting of the minds. Enjoyed Lallybroch, even though I wished it was more fleshed out. I can deal with that, as well as the abbreviated fade to black. I've gotten somewhat used to the J & C Lite relationship. Seeing Colum show up seemed really a stretch. Seeing the encounter with Claire and Laoghaire...huge stretch. Seeing Jamie about to sign over a Deed of Sasine to Lord Lovat...not happening. Seeing them make Young Simon such a wimp and the plot of Laoghaire to entice him so much to make a man out of him...insulting my intelligence. Claire's vision? Ugh! All this equals is a vast waste of time in an episode. This plotline, along with showing BPC up in front of Sandringham at the dinner party, are to me such weak, , thin, shaky, implausible changes. They say they make some changes because they would be hard to believe and then expect us to swallow this drivel?

    I for one am getting really tired of hearing how they have time constraints and then they include unnecessary scenes (dildoes comes to mind). I listen to the podcasts and they make my blood boil when I hear them and it sounds like they have no idea of the source material. I am hanging on Diana Galbadon's reassurances that things will get better like a life raft, but this rabid, obsessed fan is starting to lose interest. I watched this show because I wanted to see Outlander brought to life, not a show just called Outlander. Hope I start seeing it again soon.

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  12. Oh, Maryann, my sincerest apologies for any copays YOU may incur (hopefully your autonomic nervous sytem has returned your body to homeostasis!) I have to agree with nearly all you have laid out. I'm wondering just how much of the inconsistencies from week to week can be laid at the feet of a large and diverse writing and directors team. Is this the norm for other TV shows out there? Thanks, Maryann, for reading and commenting--we will need to do this over a wee dram of our own soon.

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  13. You have encapsulated very well my inner conflict regarding the whole adaptation. I love it, I think Ron and his team do an amazing job of a herculean task, and I know there have to be changes from page to screen. That said, some of the changes they have chosen to make baffle and frustrate me. I don't generally mind plot changes, as long as they don't make our favorite people behave out of character. Sadly, they often do. I don't think Ron knows the characters as we do (although Maril does) and therefore he does not make the calls the way we fans would like. As to specifics, I have loved season 2 up till now, loved each episode more than the one before. This one, 208, was such a let down. It started well at Lallybroch, but that portion was way too short. I agree with many here that we need to see more of the humor and the loving relationship between J&C. All the shenanigans at the fox's lair seemed cobbled together. Claire's hokey vision was no better at moving the story along than the original material where Claire diagnoses and treats Lovat for prostate problems (hello, she's a healer, not a seer). The Laoghaire story line was inconsistent and unwelcome, Young Simon was I don't know what or why, and Jamie would never, ever have considered signing over his land to the old man. I listened to the podcast and Ron and Anne actually talked about the fact that they did a lot of messing around with this episode, rewriting, moving, cutting, editing. And it shows. Unfortunately their summary was that the episode turned out well. I disagree. I was also surprised that Anne, who I usually love, doesn't understand why people don't like Laoghaire (that was from twitter). But I'm definitely in it for the long haul. I love it enough, and I still have the books.

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    1. Val, thanks for your response. Yes, so true-- Jamie signing away Lallybroch, and leaving his family and his tenants in the lurch? Never in a million. He might as well had run away with Claire instead, as was discussed early in the episode. I'm in it too, and overall feel so thrilled to have this adaptation. Some aspects are portrayed beautifully; some, less so!

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  14. I thought the whole political chess game with Lord Lovat, Colum and Jamie was great, but why did they have to make Young Simon such a milk toast? Historically he becomes a leader of men and a General. The excuse was that they didn't want Old and Young Simon to be too similar in temperament, but you could have differentiated them without making a laughable character out of Young Simon.

    My biggest disappointment was both Jamie and Claire behaving out of character. Jamie would never conceive of signing over Lallybroch. Couldn't they come up with a more intelligent Jamie-like plan? Instead, they resorted to parlor tricks. I could have bought it if we saw some inkling that Jamie and Claire had discussed this plan to play on Lord Lovat's superstitious nature as a "Hail Mary", but according to Anne Kenney there was no such joint plan, Claire just acted on her own, putting herself at great risk to save Lallybroch.

    I can understand that RDM had to do some damage control to redeem Laoghaire given that they elevated her to such villainous status in Season 1 without thinking about the ramifications of that in her future role in Voyager and beyond. They could have had her beg for forgiveness and only get pity from Claire and left it at that, but having Claire use Laoghaire to charm Young Simon while dangling Jamie's possible forgiveness as an incentive is such a high school bitchy girl move that not even TV Claire would lower herself to. I am just grateful that Anne Kenney talked RDM out of the cat fight he envisioned. Clearly Laoghaire brings out the dark side of TV Claire who slapped her for putting the ill wish under the bed and trying to seduce Jamie (even then she apologized for losing her cool) and she screamed at her during the witch trial (who wouldn't) but Claire is not a vindictive person. Claire is an emotionally mature woman and she is not a schemer, that is why she was so uncomfortable in Paris. I also agree that the wonderful humor of Jamie and Claire is rarely seen and is one of their most charming attributes and strengths.

    That being said, I love the TV show and generally embrace the adaptations, but it disturbs me when the essence of our characters is compromised for the sake of dramatic effect.

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  15. Kathy, I hear you, in every point you raise. Us book readers know this story and all its nuances so well. RDM is a brave man to take it on!

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  16. Teddie so well said,I like most of the changes,but with a couple wasn't so taken:young Simon's character was week & in life he wasn't also bit weird with Leghair,but hope it'll translate ok for the future!All & all very happy with adaptaion as its a great visual OL & now I'm excited very,very excited for season 3&4!

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  17. Zsuzip, thank you so much! It definitely was one of those "off" episodes, but I'll take it. Yesterday was a Christmas in June World Outlander Day, no?

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    1. I should have made it a bit clearer with Leghair,Icannot come to terms with Claire getting Leghair help with young Simon, it did not gel with Claire's character for me!I understand they making more out of Leghair then what's in the books,as we bookreaders know what's coming in season 3.

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  18. I'm fairly new to the site and have written so much in various comment areas that I'm worried I'm repeating myself - extensively! I just love all of the different points of view I find in discussions here. So here goes again.
    I've been wondering since around ¾ of the way into season 1 who has a say among the investors/productions/creative team. The show seemed to lose track of its story so suddenly around the Lallybroch episode that I was stunned. Suffice it to say that your line, Teddy, "Ron take note...sex scenes between Jamie and Claire are never gratuitous. EVER." Hilarious and on exactly on point. I'm just not sure Ron is responsible, much as he takes it all on his shoulders. Diana Gabaldon tells us that Sony and Starz both have script approval and I wonder how much that has come into play. Teddy, to answer one question, most shows have way more writers than Outlander.
    I was a non reader, never heard of the books, when I came upon season 1. The show pulled me in on its own and proved that the story of a passionate love can be intertwined with plots of honor and cruelty, political intrigue, engaging entanglements, horrific enemies, and remain breathtaking. The actors, writers, directors created a wonderful Jamie and Claire and wove their constant level of sexual tension, falling in love and lots of consummation, through those great plotlines. Until I read Outlander after the season ended, I didn't know that Lallybroch was where our couple cemented their relationship following Claire's willing choice. I simply sensed something was missing and, with the exception of the Wentworth episodes and Claire's TELLING Frank about her grand passion, we haven't wholly seen it return.
    Like others, I miss the much heralded camera-that-doesn't-cut-away from the beauty of bodies and hearts making love. Is it that these scenes showed everything from preamble to finish that's supposed to be from a woman's gaze? It seems to me a pretty fantastic time was had by all. Even if that kind of sex was brought back, without all the wanting in between it wouldn’t have the same impact (although it would be nice, thank you.) I have a feeling that, no matter what the original intent of the Outlander's creative team was, network/investors/whoever "chickened out," and went back to the traditional (and faulty) TV theory that married couples kill shows. That they needed to ratchet back that story in order to attract a certain audience. Maybe demographic ratings support that ideea, for subscription TV, those ratings don't really apply and the number of viewers on non-traditional platforms suggest otherwise. Unfortunately, when a show is as successful as Outlander in its first season, the people who pull the purse strings tend to get more involved and think they know better - the cause many a series’ "sophomore" slump and even demise if they don’t. I so hope, and look forward to, the show’s ability to come back from a shaky season.
    I love so much about Outlander, especially now that it’s back in Scotland. The cinematography there and Bear's music are enough to keep me enthralled. Add in the return of a wonderfully strong Jamie, more mature and with material Sam Heughan can once again sink his teeth into, and I'll make it through whatever the rest of the season brings. I just don't expect the return of Jamie and Claire as we once knew them, which makes me incredibly sad. And almost scared to watch since it’s obviously their last chance and there doesn’t seem time. I’m trying to remain positive that there will be enough to distract, maybe the return of the Scot cast? Here’s hoping.

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    1. I just reread my comment and noticed that I always said Jamie and Claire instead of Claire and Jamie, which I usually say. Maybe its because I missed Jamie in Paris, but I'm glad to see our Claire mostly returned as well. I'll enjoy them both as long as I can!!!

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    2. Diane, thank you so much for your detailed and insightful comments. I can't imagine the vetting of storyline issues that must take place for a screen adaptation of this huge book. I am hopeful that we will get to see Jamie and Claire cement their love bond very very soon; the waitng foisted upon us may make the heart grow firmer, aye? (Jamie's words, if you've read that far, lol.). I agree with all of your "loves".

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  19. Hi Teddie...thanks for your thoughts on Ep. 8. I thought it was the worst of all of them so far. It strayed so far from the book...not that I'm a book purist and I've read DIA 3 times. I felt something was all wrong so I picked up in DIA just where that episode started. They have everything all out of order. They didn't go to see Lord Lovat until after they were already training outside of E'burgh. I'm getting ready to read about the Old Fox now. Colum had already died by then so he wasn't at Lord Lovat's. Claire had already been helping BJR to take care of his brother Alex in E'burgh and Claire was getting info from BJR about the English troops. Plus there was so much left out that could have been touched on. I agree about not enough Lallybroch time, it took place over quite a few months. I don't like this episode and I see no reason why Leery had to be reintroduced again. It didn't move the story along one bit. Ep. 209 is a lot better!

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  20. Thanks for writing, Marg. I don't mind so much when they juggle the sequence of the original story, but this episode was jarring in a number of ways for both the Jamie and Claire character management. I don't know DiA nearly as well as the other books, especially because of the pall of foreboding that weaves throughout the story. In contrast, I also loved ep 2.09 and thought it just about perfect in the handling of the book material and the addition of some new story elements. I love the series overall, but would love more consistency from episode to episode. We now know that we will be getting S 3 and 4. As I said more worrying but hopefully optimistic. Thanks for your response!

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